News

 

History Of Petroleum:

Gasoline is a transparent, petroleum-derived liquid that is used primarily as a fuel in internal combustion engines. It consists mostly of organic compounds obtained by the fractional distillation of petroleum, enhanced with a variety of additives. The modern history of petroleum and thus gasoline began in the 19th century with the refining of kerosene from crude oil. Although the Russian Dubinin brothers had purified kerosene directly from petroleum in their factory in 1823, it was only after Ignacy Łukasiewicz improved Nova Gesner's method to develop a means of refining kerosene from the more readily available "rock oil" ("petroleum") seeps that petroleum began to be considered as a viable source of energy. We cut to the 20th century and petroleum or simply "oil" has become the decisive factor in determining the victory of the Allies during the Second World War. In 1942 Japan invades Indonesia for access to their oil reserves and the frequent Iran-Iraq skirmishes that finally required US intervention were mainly around the bone of contention which was Iran's bountiful oil wells. The global Economy it seems is obsessed with petroleum and with gasoline. Behind the increasing rarity of gasoline and thus its escalating prices is the fact that out of every barrel of crude oil, only 19 gallons of gasoline can be obtained. The rest of the petroleum goes into producing kerosene, diesel and other fractional distillation derivatives.

 

Market Analysis

The Gas industry is expected to generate revenue of about $133.5 billion in 2012 after annualized revenue growth of 1.6% over the five years to 2012. Overall, though, lower sales volumes offset the higher gas prices that favor the Gas Stations industry's revenue growth. During the recession, consumers pulled back on expenses and drove fewer miles, leading to the lower sales volumes. While troubling for traditional gas stations, this bodes extremely well for GasSupp.com as the company will offer products at a reduced price and in a much more convenient format.

 

Even with recent significant activity from key downstream markets, the industry is losing sales to its larger sister industry, the Gas Stations with Convenience Stores industry. This is another point that should be considered favorable for GasSupp.com as it points to consumers being willing to veer toward options as opposed to simply relying on traditional means. Consumers are increasingly favoring gas stations with on-site convenience stores. Likewise, gas station owners prefer having convenience stores on-site because they provide products that typically have higher profit margins per purchase than gas. On-site convenience stores also benefit owners because marked-up pricing on convenience items tend to pad profit margins. Additionally, convenience store products experience less volatility and, therefore, provide steady income for operators. The shift among consumers and owners to gas stations with convenience stores has dampened the industry's prospects for the next five years.

 

Industry revenue is highly sensitive to trends in oil prices, which depend on global supply and demand. Oil prices are forecast to increase over the five years to 2017 as the pace of global economic growth picks up, with growth in demand outpacing growth in supply. Customers will absorb price increases as they return to the road and consumer spending rises. During this period, higher oil prices will flow through to gas pricing and drive industry revenue up about 1.5% per year on average to $143.6 billion. However, the industry is still anticipated to remain in the decline phase of its life cycle as more consumers and businesses choose gas stations with convenience stores than those without.

 

 
Market Analysis

The Oil and Gas industry profited by $271 billion in 2012 after annualized revenue growth of 1.6% over the previous five years. Overall, though, lower sales volumes offset the higher gas prices that favor the gas station industry's revenue growth. During the recession, consumers pulled back on expenses and drove fewer miles, leading to the lower sales volumes. While troubling for traditional gas stations, this bodes extremely well for GasSupp.com, offering products at a reduced price and in a much more convenient format.

 

Even with recent significant activity from key downstream markets, the industry is losing sales to its larger sister industry, gas stations with convenience stores. This is another point that should be considered favorable for GasSupp.com as it points to consumers being willing to veer towards alternatives as opposed to simply relying on traditional means. Consumers are increasingly favoring gas stations with on-site convenience stores. Likewise, gas station owners prefer having convenience stores on-site because they provide products that typically have higher profit margins per purchase than gas. On-site convenience stores also benefit owners because marked-up pricing on convenience items tend to pad profit margins. Additionally, convenience store products experience less volatility and, therefore, provide steady income for operators. The shift among consumers and owners to gas stations with convenience stores has dampened the industry's prospects for the next five years.

 

Industry revenue is highly sensitive to oil price fluctuations, spurred global supply and demand. Oil prices are forecast to increase steadily into 2017 as the pace of global economic growth picks up, with growth in demand outpacing growth in supply. Customers will absorb price increases as they return to the road and consumer spending rises. During this period, higher oil prices will flow through to gas pricing and drive industry revenue up about 1.5% per year on average to $143.6 billion. However, the industry is still anticipated to remain in the decline phase of its life cycle as more consumers and businesses choose gas stations with convenience stores than those without.

 

 
Rise in 'Slider' Thieves Stealing Purses From Cars

Rise in 'Slider' Thieves Stealing Purses From Cars Thieves who prey on women at gas stations are being caught on camera across the country.

 


ABC Entertainment News | ABC Business News

 

 
Who Really Owns Big Oil? Another Reason to Consider GasSupp.com

Something that is immensely important to our business and to businesses depending on oil is: Do we really know who owns the oil in the world? Most people quickly assume that large corporations are the owners; however, in reality nearly 50 percent of all corporate oil shares are held by public and private pension and retirement funds, including 401(k)s and IRAs. Individual investors own 20 percent, while financial institutions and asset management companies own 27 percent. That's 97 percent. Less than three percent is owned by corporate executives and board members. So it is likely, in some way, that you have stakes in an oil company. As a probable oil owner, at least on paper, it is only fitting that the gas come to you, instead of you working hard to get it. That is what our model for the future is built on.

 

 
History of Petroleum

Gasoline is a transparent, petroleum-derived liquid used primarily as fuel in internal combustion engines. It consists mostly of organic compounds obtained by the fractional distillation of petroleum, enhanced with a variety of additives.

 

The modern history of petroleum, and thus gasoline, began in the 19th century with the refining of kerosene from crude oil. Although the Russian Dubinin brothers had purified kerosene directly from petroleum in their factory in 1823, it was only after Ignacy Łukasiewicz improved Nova Gesner's method to develop a means of refining kerosene from the more readily available "rock oil" ("petroleum") seeps that petroleum began to be considered as a viable source of energy.

 

In the 20th century, petroleum, or simply "oil", became the decisive factor for an Allied victory during the World War II. Petroleum has been the reason for the many conflicts seen around the globe. In 1942 Japan invaded Indonesia to control their oil reserves. While in the Middle East, frequent Iran-Iraq skirmishes finally requiring US intervention, were centered around control of Iran's bountiful oil wells.

 

The global economy is obsessed with petroleum and with gasoline. Behind the increasing rarity of gasoline and thus its escalating prices is the fact that out of every barrel of crude oil, only 19 gallons of gasoline is produced. The rest of the petroleum goes into producing kerosene, diesel and other fractional distillation derivatives.

 

 
WOMEN PLEASE READ THIS...

A friend stopped at a pay-at-the-pump gas station to get gas. After filling up, paying at the pump and starting to leave, the voice of the attendant inside came over the speaker. He told her that the card did not process correctly and that she needed to come inside to pay. The lady was confused because the transaction showed complete and approved. She relayed that to him and was getting ready to leave but the attendant, once again, urged her to come in to pay or there would be trouble. She proceeded to go inside and started arguing with the attendant about his threat. He told her to calm down and listen carefully. He said that while she was pumping gas, a guy slipped into the back seat of her car on the other side and the attendant had already called the police.

 

She became frightened and looked out to see her car door open and the guy slip out. Reports are now surfacing about a new gang initiation to hijack and bring back a woman and/or her car. One way they do this is by crawling under women's cars while they're pumping gas. They are also targeting women at grocery stores after dark.

 

Please pass this on to other women, young and old alike. Be extra careful going to and from your car at all times. If at all possible, don't travel alone at night.

 

The message:

  • ALWAYS lock your car doors, even if you're gone for just a second!
  • Check underneath your car when approaching it for re-entry, and check in the back before getting in.
  • Always be aware of your surroundings and of other individuals in your general vicinity, particularly at night!

Feel free to copy this and to send this to everyone to keep them safe.

AND GUYS...Please share this with every woman you know.

 

 
Don't be tricked by gas station cash discounts

Gas stations lure customers with low rates at the pump. What customers do not realize is that the rate shown at the pump is, oftentimes, the cash rate.

 

For example, a Consumer Reports editor recently used her credit card to buy gas at a Long Island, N.Y. station, not realizing that the price she thought she was being charged was based on a cash discount of a whopping 70 cents per gallon. She ended up paying nearly $13 more for the 18.5-gallon purchase than she would have had she used cash. We've seen reports of other consumers unintentionally paying more, as well.

 

While the difference between the cash and credit prices at gas stations is typically much less— about 5 to 10 cents a gallon, according to the National Association of Convenience Stores— there have been reports about stations charging credit card customers as much as $1 more per gallon than those paying with greenbacks.

 

Station owners offering cash discounts point out that when accepting credit cards, they’re charged bank fees, which average about 2 percent of the cost, or eight cents per gallon when gasoline is at $4/gallon. Debit card users are charged an average of 24 cents per swipe — which may be reduced pending a federal court decision. While ten states prohibit stations from passing on these costs to credit card customers in the form of price surcharges, stations are permitted to offer cash discounts, even though, from a consumer perspective, it probably doesn't make a difference whether it's called a surcharge or discount.

 

What to do:

  • Comparison shop. No matter how you pay, shop around for the best price. Just because a station is offering a cash discount doesn’t necessarily mean its cash price is the lowest or its credit price the highest. There are several online apps that let you compare prices close to home or in metropolitans of your choice, so you can find the most convenient location at a price that works for you.
  • Pay attention. If you’re using a credit card, be sure you know what the credit price is, and don’t be fooled by what may be a low cash-only price. In some states, stations that offer a cash discount must display the higher, credit price at least as prominently as the discounted one.
  • Do the math. If you’re using a cash-back credit card, such as the PenFed Platinum Cash Rewards Visa Card that returns 5 percent on gas purchases, you need to do some calculating. At 5 percent back on $4 gasoline, the rebate translates to 20-cents a gallon. If a station’s credit price is 10 cents more than the cash price, using your card, and getting the rebate, results in paying just under $3.90 a gallon, compared to $4/gallon with cash. So, on a 20-gallon purchase, you come out ahead using your card.
  • Check debit card prices. Some stations give debit card customers a discount. However, in most cases, debit prices usually are the same as credit prices.
  • Carry enough cash. Unless you need to use your credit card, perhaps for record keeping, carrying cash helps you take advantage of cash discount pricing that might be far lower than prices at other stations.
  • Fix it. If you mistakenly end up paying more because you used your credit card at a station that offers a cash discount, try getting the charge adjusted. There's nothing to lose, and it worked for our editor. When she returned to express her outrage about the 70 cent price difference, the station gave her additional gas to make up the extra amount she paid using her credit card during her previous visit.   

Gassupp.com

 

 
Buying Gas The Smart Way

 

TIPS ON PUMPING GAS

I don't know what the rest of the nation is paying for gas...but here in northern California we are paying between $3.75 and $4.10 per gallon.

 

I work in San Jose, CA and we deliver about 4 million gallons of fuel in a 24-hour period through the pipeline. We alternate deliveries between diesel, jet fuel, and gasoline, regular and premium grades.

 

We have 34-storage tanks totaling in capacity of 16,800,000 gallons. My work in the petroleum industry has spanned the past 31 years, and with it, I have learned a few tricks that will help you get more of your money's worth for every gallon you purchase:

    • Fill gas in the early morning when the ground temperature is still cold. Remember that all service stations have their storage tanks buried below ground. The colder the ground the more dense the gasoline, which means you get more in each gallon. When temperatures are warmer gasoline expands, so buying in the afternoon or in the evening means your gallon is not exactly a full gallon. Specific gravity and temperature have significant impacts on gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, ethanol and other petroleum products.
    • A one-degree increase in temperature is a big deal in this business. Yet, service stations have zero temperature compensation at the pumps. When filling up do not squeeze the trigger of the nozzle to maximum. If you look closely, you will see that the trigger has three stages: low, medium, and high. Pump on low mode to minimize the vapors that are created while pumping. All hoses at the pump have a vapor return. If you are pumping on high, some of the liquid that goes into your tank becomes vapor. Those vapors get sucked up and back into the underground storage tank so you're getting less for your money.
    • One of the most important tips is to fill up when your gas tank is HALF FULL. The reason for this is the more gas you have in your tank, the less air you’ll have occupying the empty space, which reduces evaporation. Gasoline evaporates faster than you can imagine. Gasoline storage tanks at stations have an internal floating roof. This roof serves as zero clearance between the gas and the atmosphere, so it minimizes the evaporation. Unlike service stations, every tanker that we load is temperature compensated so that every gallon is actually the exact amount.
    • Try not to fill gas when the tanker is filling up storage tanks at the stations. Gasoline gets stirred up as the gas is delivered into the storage tanks, and you might pick up some of the dirt that normally settles on the bottom.
 

News

  • Buying Gas The Smart Way

    TIPS ON PUMPING GAS I don't know what you guys are paying for gasoline.... but here in California we...
    Read more »

  • News

    History Of Petroleum: Gasoline is a transparent, petroleum-derived liquid that is used primarily as a fuel in internal combustion engines.
    Read more »

  • WOMEN PLEASE READ THIS...

    IMPORTANT PLEASE READ: A friend stopped at a pay-at-the-pump gas station to get gas.
    Read more »

  • OUR FREQUENT FLYERS

    Our Frequent-Flyers program gives our registered members who travel, the convenience of knowing that
    their car’s tank will be filled when they land. Let us know the day they need refueling, and one of our tankers will be there well-ahead of arrival time to make sure the car is ready to go.

  • CONNECT WITH US

  • CONNECT WITH US

      YouTube
  • Nilo Petrolium